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  #1  
Old 29-01-2013
djmcnz djmcnz is offline
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Default Ti Coated Suspension Shafts?

Hi experts and racers... can I tap into your experience again?

After a few packs... perhaps 5, I need to clean my suspension shafts because they "gunk" up a bit. Don't get me wrong, it's not a real "problem" but it certainly impacts efficiency a tiny bit. I can feel the extra resistance (manifesting as inconsistent lower arm swing) over the actual shock resistance when I articulate the suspension on the work bench.

After careful inspection this "gunk" does create micro wear on the stainless shafts as well, resulting in some (micro) pitting. The pitting exacerbates the issue. The shafts are all still perfectly straight.

Has anybody run the Ti coated versions? Care to share your experience?

I'm pretty sure they'll address the pitting, stopping the problem from exacerbating but are they likely to fix the "gunk" buildup problem at all? Are they more "slippery" or less prone to "retaining" grime?

I realise this is in the margins but I'm not really looking for performance gains, rather maintenance reduction. Having said that, removing and wiping the shafts is not a problem but it would be nice to forget about them and relegate them to my '3 month overhaul' cycle rather than my constant 'watch and maintain' cycle.

Thoughts? Snake oil?

Edit & for reference:

53851 - 3x46mm Titanium Coated Suspension Shafts (2 Pcs.)
54388 - 3x48.5mm Titanium Coated Suspension Shaft (2 Pcs.)
54387 - 2.6x27mm Titanium Coated Suspension Shaft (2 Pcs.)
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Old 29-01-2013
taomo taomo is offline
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I bought the #54388 (3x48,5mm) and #54387 (2.6x27mm) for the TRF502x but not arrived yet. I don't know if the #19804360 (3x41mm) have a titanium version...
My problem was that the original ones have been bent (the 3x48,5mm more than others) to the point that I had to straighten them with pliers. I must say that I broke the rear suspension mount (#54441) and one right front lower arm (#51275) in 2 months approx. running.
I'm sure that the titanium versions will help
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Old 29-01-2013
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Jamesk Jamesk is offline
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I have fitted the ti shafts to both my cars, the main reason was behind the change was due to the steel ones bending most notable on tracks with big jumps. So far the ti shafts have not bent. I had also swapped to ti shafts on the shocks and not broken again.

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Old 30-01-2013
djmcnz djmcnz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taomo View Post
My problem was that the original ones have been bent ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesk View Post
...was due to the steel ones bending most notable on tracks with big jumps...
Wow. Okay that's interesting, I've not had that problem, even with a few blasts at the local 1/8 track. It's certainly from uneven landings I'm afraid to say - more steering and punch needed mid-flight. Perhaps I need to be more mindful of that, thanks!

These are marketed as Ti coated only though, is that going to make any difference at all to the stiffness? I find that hard to imagine. I thought it was purely for surface protection?
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Old 30-01-2013
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Origineelreclamebord Origineelreclamebord is offline
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I've never bent the suspension shafts so far either (TRF201) - and that's after more than a year of running (and loads of crashes - cartwheels, nosedives, crashing into metal bars and even a head on collision into a wall a month or so back). I guess with the 4WDs extra weight they may bend (quicker) though.

As for strength, the coating shouldn't matter for strength but I can imagine that they might use a non-stainless type of steel, and perhaps a stronger one too while they're at it?

Oh, and as for gunk adding up... If it keeps getting in there, could you find a (simple) way to prevent this? Small flaps and plates to divert the dirt? It might be better to prevent than cure, if the coated shafts even cure the problem of gunk that adds up in there...
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Old 30-01-2013
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Every R/C Car I've ever raced has built up "gunk" in the suspension arms. Personally I think it is result of friction between the metal rod and the plastic arm. The best thing to do it just regular maintenance. One thing though is get a fine drill, that fits snug but wont make the hole larger and twist it through a few times by hand. You'll notice some dust coming out.

When you reinstall don't use a lubricant as the gunk + lube = goo, i.e. it may mud up and be worse!

I run the titanium arms in the back of my 201 as other have said, they bent the originals, well so did I using 501X rear arms.
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  #7  
Old 31-01-2013
kidcongo kidcongo is offline
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The TI coating is only supposed to make the surface more durable, but I believe Tamiya makes them out of harder steel as well, or the process of coating them with TI makes the underlying steel harder. I bent all of my "stock" shafts in succession. I have never had a TI shaft bend, but I have broken a couple (fractured) in front-end collisions. The fact they snap, but don't bend lead me to believe they are harder steel.

All in all, I feel the TI shafts are way more durable and are supposed to make your O-Rings last longer.

Last edited by kidcongo; 31-01-2013 at 01:39 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old 31-01-2013
djmcnz djmcnz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidcongo View Post
The TI coating is only supposed to make the surface more durable, but I believe Tamiya makes them out of harder steel as well, or the process of coating them with TI makes the underlying steel harder. I bent all of my "stock" shafts in succession. I have never had a TI shaft bend, but I have broken a couple (fractured) in front-end collisions. The fact they snap, but don't bend lead me to believe they are harder steel.

All in all, I feel the TI shafts are way more durable and are supposed to make your O-Rings last longer.
Since you've referred to O-rings I assume you're talking about your shock shafts? Either way I think the same logic applies.

I'm fascinated by the fact that you've fractured/snapped the Ti ones - indeed if that's the case it would add support to the theory that they're stronger but more brittle.

They're not that expensive... maybe I'll pick some up for the inboard hinges.

Thanks for all your comments guys.
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  #9  
Old 01-02-2013
kidcongo kidcongo is offline
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OK you're right. I was thinking shock shafts. Not the suspension hinge shafts. Sorry for the goof up
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